Patrick Brown won the  2019 FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo for his work
No Place on Earth

Photo: Patrick Brown © 2019 Panos/UNICEF


 

Photographer Patrick Brown won the FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo for his project “No Place on Earth,” documenting the world's fastest growing refugee crisis and one of the most rapid human exodus in recent history. Risking death at sea or on foot, more than 700,000 Rohingya fled the destruction of their homes and persecution in the northern Rakhine State of Myanmar. Arriving in Bangladesh at the makeshift camps, most refugees reported harrowingly consistent stories of murder and rape, all of which testify to a deliberate campaign of eradication. “No Place on Earth” provides an intimate portrait of the Rohingya survivors  and their bleak conditions in overcrowded refugee camps.

Finalists: 

Mikael Owunna for “Limitless Africans”. The work is a collaborative response between the photographer and his community, to re-define what it means to be an immigrant, African and queer in North America and Europe at this time.

Fausto Podavini  for “OMO Change.”  The work aims to be a meditation on how large-scale investments can put at risk a delicate balance between humans and their environment that has persisted for hundreds of years. 

Brown’ work will be published in a hardbound FotoEvidence book to be released this spring.  Brown, Owunna and Podavini will be exhibited at the World Press Photo exhibit in Amsterdam in April and at the FotoEvidence Book Award Exhibit in New York at the Bronx Documentary Center, opening May 30th 2019.

 






No Place on Earth


by Patrick Brown

The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights has called the crackdown in Rakhine State, Burma, “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing”. There is nothing clean about Ethnic cleansing – up close and on the ground, it’s murder, it’s rape, it’s people being slaughtered in the most systematic and barbaric way. It’s people. While euphemisms and diplomatic language can obscure the true horror inflicted by oppressive regimes, photography cuts through all the cold clinical terminology. Through photographs we’re forced to confront the cruel reality of what ethnic cleansing really looks like.
Almas Khatun, 40, survived the massacre at her Tula Toli village in Myanmar. She says a soldier held her arms behind her back and forced her to watch as other soldiers killed her seven children, her husband and two brothers. She came alone to Bangladesh.
14 December 2017
Photo: Patrick Brown © 2019 Panos/UNICEF

Read the full story here.
 

FotoEvidence        

fotowitness   

Interview with Patrick BrownBy Svetlana Bachevanova

"I met people that had gone through something worse than hell, and survived but who will never be free from the horrors they have experienced. I never witness any of these horrific crimes myself, but the stories I listened to were beyond comprehension in their cruelty and unbelievable sorrow and pain inflicted. 

Mostly it was the pure scale of the crisis and the amount of people fleeing that took me by surprise and which I wasn’t prepared for. On top of this came the stories I was about to hear, such as the Tula Toli massacre, which involved some of the most horrific stories I’ve ever heard in my life.." Photo: Sun Thapphawut © 2019 Redlightstudio.
Read to interview here.
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FotoEvidence

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No Place on Earth by Patrick Brown


Since 2017, photographer Patrick Brown has documented the world's fastest growing refugee crisis and one of the most rapid human outflows in recent history. Risking death at sea or on foot, more than 700,000 Rohingya fled the destruction of their homes and persecution in the northern Rakhine State of Myanmar for neighboring Bangladesh. Arriving at the makeshift camps, most refugees reported harrowingly consistent stories of murder and rape, all of which testify to a deliberate campaign of eradication. “No Place On Earth” provides an intimate portrait of the survivors of the recent persecution and their bleak conditions in overcrowded refugee camps.
Order the book here.

FotoEvidence

the gallery

Andrea Star Reese

From the series "Urban Cave", published  in a book.

Color  photograph
Printed on archival paper
Print size: 8x10 

To inquire about the price contact Andrea Kennedy at info@fotoevidence.com

 

Click on the image to view his testimony


FotoEvidence

news

FotoEvidence at
World Press Photo

Svetlana Bachevanova, founder and publisher of FotoEvidence Press, presents 'Standing Strong' on behalf of Josué Rivas, the winner of the 2018 FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo. 

Danielle Villasana, presents her project, 'A Light Inside'. and issues trust  and access she faced creating her intimate reflection on the life of trans women in Peru. 

Marcus Bleasdale, 2015 FotoEvidence Book Award winner challenges the photojournalism communit to address issues of sexual harrassment.