Persecution of homosexuality in Uganda

by Benedicte Desrus

17 February 2010 – Kampala, Uganda - Ugandan worshipper wears a banner with homophobic message:" homosexual is evil" at an anti-gay rally held by religious and political leaders who are fighting homosexuality at Christianity Focus Centre in Kampala’s biggest slum, Kisenyi. David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament.The bill proposes that a new offence be created in Uganda named "aggravated homosexuality" which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive, or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison.
15 february 2010 - Jinja, Uganda - Demonstrator during a rally in the industrial city of Jinja, east of the capital Kampala. He carries an anti-gay sign with the message: "Yes we can say No 2 Sodomy". David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament.The bill proposes that a new offence be created in Uganda named "aggravated homosexuality" which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive, or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison.
February 23, 2011 - Kampala, Uganda - Giles Muhame, the managing editor of the Ugandan newspaper Rolling Stone, points to the the face of David Kato, a prominent ugandan gay rights campaigner. Last month David Kato was beaten to death in his home near Kampala only weeks after winning a lawsuit against the Ugandan newspaper Rolling Stone. In october 2010, the tabloid published the names, adresses and photographs of a dozen public figures, including Kato, who it believed to be gay, under the heading “Hang Them”. Uganda’s gay population now face renewed suppression in a country where homosexual acts already carry a punishment of 14 year’s jail. Some religious and political leaders are pushing for the death penalty for people who have gay sex with disabled people, under-18s, or while being HIV positive. David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament.
17 February 2010 – Kampala, Uganda - Ugandan worshipper reacts after Ugandan Pastor Martin Ssempa screens what he called gay porn during a church service at Christianity Focus Centre in Kampala’s biggest slum, Kisenyi in a bid to garner support for the anti-homosexuality bill. David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament.The bill proposes that a new offence be created in Uganda named "aggravated homosexuality" which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive, or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison.
17 February 2010 – Kampala, Uganda - David Bahati (center) the author of the anti-homosexuality bill is blessed by Pastor Martin Ssempa (R), Sheikh Badruh (L), and other religious leaders at an anti-gay church service at the Christianity Focus Centre in Kampala’s biggest slum, Kisenyi. David Bahati, Ugandan politician, member of the ruling National Resistance Movement and MP in the Ugandan parliament, came to international attention in October 2009 after introducing the Uganda's Anti-Homosexuality Bill as a Private Member's Bill on 13 October proposing that a new offence be created in Uganda named "aggravated homosexuality" which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive. or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. The bill also includes provisions for Ugandans who engage in same-sex sexual relations outside of Uganda, asserting that they may be extradited for punishment back to Uganda, and includes penalties for individuals, companies, media organisations, or non-governmental organisations that support LGBT rights. Homosexuality is currently illegal in Uganda, as it is in many sub-Saharan African countries, punishable by incarceration in prison for up to 14 years. The proposed legislation in Uganda, however, has been noted by several news agencies to be heavily influenced by American evangelical Christians.
14 february 2010 – Kampala, Uganda – Ugandans at a bar in Kampala which allows homosexuals. The bar is one of the few bars in town qualified as “Safe Zone” by the gay community. David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament. The bill proposes the death penalty for homosexuals, imprisonment for heterosexuals who don’t turn gays over to the police and the abolition of all organizations that support gay rights. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison.
17 February 2010 – Kampala, Uganda - An Ugandan worshipper cries and screams after Ugandan Pastor Martin Ssempa screens “gay porn” during a church service at Christianity Focus Centre in Kampala’s biggest slum, Kisenyi in bid to garner support for the anti-homosexuality bill. David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament.The bill proposes that a new offence be created in Uganda named "aggravated homosexuality" which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive, or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison.
16 february 2010 - Kampala, Uganda – Ugandan Pastor Martin Ssempa screens gay porn to warn press against what he calls the danger of homosexuality at a press conference in Kampala. He recently mades news for planning on February 17th a "million man march" in Uganda in support of the anti-homosexuality bill. While public support for the bill remains strong, the Ugandan government is concerned by international pressure and outrage over a proposed bill that would further criminalize homosexuality in the country, including adding life in prison and death sentences to the punishments.
27 february 2010 - Kampala, Uganda - Portrait of a closeted homosexual in Uganda. David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament.The bill proposes that a new offence be created in Uganda named "aggravated homosexuality" which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive, or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison
February 22, 2011 - Kampala, Uganda - Notes in a registration book showing people who attended "Sodomy case” counselling at the office of Ugandan Pentecostal Pastor Solomon Male. Male is part of the National Coalition against Homosexuality and Sexual Abuse in Uganda. He claims he was the first person in the country to come out openly against gays. Male believes that no one is born gay and that through counselling they can be cured of this "affliction". David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament.The bill proposes that a new offence be created in Uganda named "aggravated homosexuality" which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive, or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison.
4 march 2010 – Kampala, Uganda – Auf Usaam Mukwaya, an outed gay man and a friend participate in a ritual run by a gay witch-doctor to prevent the passing of an anti-homosexuality bill in the Uganda parliament. David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament. The bill proposes the death penalty for homosexuals, imprisonment for heterosexuals who don’t turn gays over to the police and the abolition of all organizations that support gay rights. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison.
 7 march 2010 - Kampala, Uganda - Auf Usaam Mukwaya visits his mother in the slum where he grew up. Since he was outed in one of the local papers, and his face was shown on television he had to move out. David Bahati’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill was tabled in Ugandan Parliament on October 2009, and is currently before the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee of Parliament.The bill proposes that a new offence be created in Uganda named "aggravated homosexuality" which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive, or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda and punishable by up to 14 years in prison.